UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DAILY
 

Artist Spotlight: Trevor Hall
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By Ashleen Aguilar
January 28, 2010


Trevor Hall is not old. His 23 years seem like too small a number for all the accomplishments he boasts. Hall has released six albums (although some would argue seven, as 2007’s The Elephant’s Door was leaked onto the Internet, but never commercially released). He has traveled with several sold-out tours with artists such as Matisyahu and Colbie Caillat, and his song “Other Ways” was featured on the Shrek the Third soundtrack. Hall signed with Vanguard Records, but he had a stint with Geffen Records.


The South Carolina native signed to Geffen during his senior year at the Idyllwild Arts Academy, located outside of Los Angeles, where he studied classical guitar. Idyllwild is an international school, and Hall said he was inspired by the connections art can make.

“It was an amazing experience to see how art translated beyond race, beyond culture, and that was cool to me,” Hall said.

Hall has always been interested in the music of other cultures. He surfed a lot as a kid and was naturally introduced to Bob Marley’s songbook.

“[Reggae] is a large part of surf culture,” Hall said. “I heard Bob Marley for the first time, and I was influenced by not only his music, but his whole cultur,; his faith.” Spirituality is an important part of Hall’s life. If he weren’t playing music professionally, he said he would devote himself to learning about different faiths. In fact, Hall just returned from his third pilgrimage to India, a country and culture he holds in high regard.

“I really like Indian folk music,” Hall said. “It has so much soul and spiritual power to it. Even if you don’t understand the words, you can feel it in your heart.”

Hall has embarked on a headlining tour supporting his last, self-titled release. Stop number four is our very own HUB this weekend. Hall is reported to put on a powerful live performance, and he recognizes the importance of the connection he makes with his audience.

“People don’t fully understand how much they are a part of [a concert],” Hall explained. “I can [perform to] a room of 50 people who have a lot of energy, and it’s not their energy and my energy anymore. It’s just energy. In order to connect, I just try to be myself. Somebody’s always listening.”

The performance of the song “The Lime Tree,” from Trevor Hall Live, is an amazing example of the power behind Hall’s live show. The husky timbre of his voice creates an intimate experience for artist and audience, and that unified energy can make the venue vibrate.

Hall’s thoughts on harmony extend past the live performance. Hall co-wrote the song “Unity” with his friend Matisyahu, and he said it refers to the unity of all beliefs and the unity of ideas inside oneself.

In the track, Hall sings “I just want to melt away in its grace, drift away into that sacred place where there’s no more you and me, no more they and we; just unity.”

Hall’s outlook on life and the faith he holds is strong and sure for any young person, both in spirituality and in music. While he doesn’t want to tell people what they should get from his music, he takes comfort in sharing his gift.

“Music, you know, when I was growing up it was something that I loved,” Hall said. “I thought, ‘Maybe this is what I need to do. Maybe this is how I give back.’ In my heart of hearts, music is what I have. I can share what’s been given to me. I can give it back.”