SAVANNAH MORNING NEWS
 
Hilton Head Island native Trevor Hall to perform at Shoreline Ballroom on Friday
Emily Goldman | Wednesday, July 22, 2009 at 12:30 am

Writing and performing music - a mixture of reggae and rock - is part of a spiritual process for Hilton Head Island native Trevor Hall.

When he isn't on the road spreading his music, this 22-year-old lives outside of Los Angeles in an ashram - an open community whose members focus on spiritual practice including meditation and prayer.

"I go out on the road and this is my service. This is how I serve other people, through music," Hall said. "Then when the tour is over I go back to the ashram, I charge up my batteries and go out and do it again."

Hall, who has played with The Wailers, Stevie Nicks, Ben Harper, Ziggy Marley and Rusted Root and whose song "Other Ways" is part of the "Shrek the Third" soundtrack, is performing Friday at the Shoreline Ballroom on Hilton Head Island to promote his new self-titled album.

Alternative folk-rock band Milhouse, made up of four friends from Charleston, will open the show.

To Hall, who cites influences as varied as Bob Marley and Indian music, time spent on the road performing in bars and clubs is not so different from life at the ashram.

"A friend said, 'wherever you are, that is where the temple is,'" Hall said. "Whether I'm in a van for eight hours or in a bar - an environment I'm not used to - wherever I am, it's practice for me to watch my mind."

Hall's spirituality is obvious in his new album.

He wrote "Unity," the album's first single, with Matisyahu - a musician known for mixing rap and reggae with Hasidic Jewish hymns - when the two were on tour last fall.

The song was the pair's response to the 2008 Mumbai shootings, which claimed the lives of more than 150 people - some known by Matisyahu.

The idea of tolerance is the obvious theme of the song, hammered home in the chorus with the words, "No more you and me, no more they and we, just unity."

"I hope people will feel good listening to it and get inspired to do good things," he said.